For a good time, there’s no better place than home.

Recently, Mark went out crab fishing.  He’s one of the good guys – won’t keep the females or undersized crab.  Unfortunately, most other folks do,

and this will have serious consequences for the future of the Dungeness Crab.

We’re in agreement.  The commercial crab fishing season pushed forward

to December 15th, and this is the second push forward.

I wish there were someone on the docks here,

to put a stop to the short-sighted harvesting methods.

Mark brought home a two-pound crab.

My daughter, Mark and I stood at the counter and ate it together.

Watch out, coming through!!

How do we cook such a monster?

We think it inhumane to drop a living creature into a pot of boiling water.  Sure, crab are a bundle of nerves.  Do they feel pain? Some say yes, some no.  Regardless, we choose not to boil them alive.

An instant death by cracking the back over a counter edge works for us.  This crab went limp instantly when he smacked it one time against the side of his workbench.  Before that, the crab was a menace, threatening at every chance to make contact with one of those pincers!

Smile for the camera!

When Mark pulled the crab up from the Pacific, it had already torn one of the pincers off of another, smaller crab.  The competitor was thrown back, sans one pincer.

As a teen, I enjoyed taking the bus to my favorite Deli and buying a crab submarine sandwich.  Those days, crab was really crab and de-licious!  I’d missed it over the years and never dreamed I’d taste crab as fresh and fine as that.

Our fresh crab was no more than two hours from the Pacific Ocean to our mouths.  The taste was exceptionally delicate, buttery and beyond comparison.  I look forward to more of the same, if only the folks would not think of  one meal, but many meals.

Do you like me now?

To get a good idea of just how big the crab is, Mark is 6’4″ and weighs 230 pounds.

Tomorrow, more dangers in the Pacific Northwest!

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